Host at An Event:

“Here is Bruce Lee, he’s playing Kato and Van Williams…”

Bruce Lee:

“I’ll say the Chinese way, (Speaks in Chinese) thank you very much.”

Interviewer:

“Now, Bruce, just look right into the camera lens, right here and tell us your name, your age and where you were born.”

Bruce Lee:

“My last name is Lee, Bruce Lee. I was born in San Francisco, in 1940. I’m 24 right now.”

Interviewer:

“And you worked in, uh, Motion Pictures in Hong Kong?”

Bruce Lee:

“Yes. Since I was around six years old.”

Interviewer:

“And when did you leave Hong Kong?”

Bruce Lee:

“1959, when I was 18.”

Interviewer:

“I see. Now, look over to me Bruce as we talk. I understand you just had a baby boy?”

Bruce Lee:

“Yeah.”

Interviewer:

“And, uh, you’ve lost a little sleep, have you?”

Bruce Lee:

“Oh, three nights.” (Laughs)

Interviewer:

“And tell the crew what time, uh, they shoot the pictures in Hong Kong?”

Bruce Lee:

“Well, it’s mostly, uh, in the morning, because it’s kind of noisy in Hong Kong. You know, around three million people there. And so, every time when you have a picture, it’s mostly, say around 12am to 5am in the morning.”

Interviewer:

“And you went to college in the United States?”

Bruce Lee:

“Yes.”

Interviewer:

“And what did you study?”

Bruce Lee:

“Uh, philosophy.”

Interviewer:

“I see. Now you told me earlier today that karate and jiujitsu are not the most powerful of the best forms of oriental fighting. What is the most powerful of the best form?”

Bruce Lee:

“Well, it’s bad to say the best, but in my opinion i think kung fu is pretty good.”

Interviewer:

“Would you tell us a little bit about kung fu?”

Bruce Lee:

“Well, kung fu is originated in China. It is the ancestor of karate and jiujitsu. It’s more of a complete system and it’s more fluid. By that, I mean it’s more flowing. There is continuity in movement instead of, uh, one movement, two movement and then stop.”

Interviewer:

“Would you look right in the camera lens and explain the principle of the glass of water as it applies to kung fu?”

Bruce Lee:

“Well, kung fu, the best example would be a glass of water. Why? Because water is the softest substance in the world but yet it can penetrate the hardest rock or anything, granite, you name it. Water also is insubstantial. By that I mean, you cannot grasp hold of it. You cannot punch it and hurt it. So, every kung fu man is trying to do that, to be soft like water and flexible and adapt itself to the opponent.”

Interviewer:

“I see. What’s the difference between a kung fu punch and a karate punch?”

Bruce Lee:

“Well, the karate punch is like an iron bar, whacked. A kung fu punch is like an iron chain with an iron ball attached to the end and it goes, and it hurts inside.”

Interviewer:

“Okay. Now, we’re going to cut and in just a second, we’ll, uh, have you stand up and show us some kung fu and some movements.”

Bruce Lee:

“Okay.”

Interviewer:

“Please. Look directly into the camera, Bruce. Directly at it and now give me a three-quarter this way and hold it. And give me a profile that way, all the way, good. Hold it. Now come back to a profile on the other side and hold that. Give me a three-quarter on that side and then give me right into the camera again. All right. Now the camera will pull back and, uh, who’s…First show me the movements in the classical Chinese Theater.”

Bruce Lee:

“Classical Chinese.”

Interviewer:

“You know, what we talked about in the office. How they walk and how they start a move.”

Bruce Lee:

“Well, in a Chinese opera they have the warrior and then the scholar. The way the warrior walk, will be something like this…walking this way straight, come out, bend, straight and then walk out of it. An ordinary scholar would be just like a female. A weakling, 90 pounds. You’ll be just walking, you know like a girl, shoulder up and everything.”

Interviewer:

“So, by the way they walk you can immediately tell.”

Bruce Lee:

“Right, uh, what character they represent.”

Interviewer:

“Now, show us some kung fu movements.”

Bruce Lee:

“Well, it is hard to show it alone but, uh, I will try to do my best.”

Interviewer:

“All right. Maybe one of the fellows will walk in.”

Bruce Lee:

“Yeah, it would be, uh…”

Interviewer:

“Go ahead. Go ahead. Come on. Okay.”

Bruce Lee:

“Although, accidents do happen, but you know. There are various kind of strikes. It depends on where you hit and what weapon you will be using. To the eyes you would use fingers. Don’t worry. To the eyes or straight at the face. From the waist, everything on.”

Interviewer:

“Hold it just a minute. Uh, let’s move this gentleman around this way. So, you’re doing it more in the camera, okay, as well.”

Bruce Lee:

“And then, there is an arm strike, using the waist again, into a backfist.”

Interviewer:

“And let’s have this director back up this way. (Laughter in the room). Okay, go ahead, continue.”

Bruce Lee:

“And then of course, kung fu is very sneaky. You know the Chinese, they always hit low from high, go back to the groin. Don’t worry.”

Interviewer:

“Turn around the other way, Bruce.”

Bruce Lee:

“Okay.”

Interviewer:

“Yeah, and uh…”

Bruce Lee:

“Would you want him…”

A man he is demonstrating with:

“These are just natural reactions.”

Interviewer:

“That’s right. Right at the camera, a little bit and show this again.”

Bruce Lee:

“All right. There’s the finger jab. There’s the punch. There is the backfist and then low. Of course, then they use leg, straight at the groin or come up. Or if I can back up a little bit, they start that coming and then come back. (Laughs) He’s kind of worried.”

Interviewer:

“He has nothing to worry about. Now, once again, uh, show us, uh, how a good kung fu man would very coolly handle it and walk away, rather than getting lost…”

Camera Man:

“Cut it! Sound. Okay.”

Interviewer:

“Now, Bruce, so that we can clearly see what you’re doing, uh, this time, uh, we’ll face the fact that there’s nobody there. Show me now the difference between jiu-jitsu which is lawmen in the bowel and kung fu which is very quick if you have an opponent.”

Bruce Lee:

“All right. For instance you will read it in the book, in a magazine and everything that when somebody grabs you, you will first do this and then this and then and then and then and then thousands of steps before you do a single thing. Of course, this kind of magazine would teach you to be feared by your enemies and admired by your friends and everything. But, uh, in kung fu it always involves a very fast motion. Like for instance, a guy grabbing your hand, it’s not the idea to do so many steps, stepping right on the instep. He’ll let go. This is what we mean by simplicity. Same thing in striking and in everything, it has to be based on a very minimum motion. So, that everything would be directly expressed in one motion. And he’s gone. Doing it gracefully. Not to go, ah, yelling and jumping all over him. Excuse me.”

Interviewer:

“Okay, now show me once again just a few movements.”

Bruce Lee:

“Well, kung fu can be practiced alone or with a partner. Uh, practicing a long day involved forms. Some imitate a crane, a monkey a praying mantis. This is a crane form. Start off. This is one of the movements in kung fu.”

Interviewer:

“Show us one more and we’ll be all through.”

Bruce Lee:

“Okay. Well, I’m glad to hear that. They have the tiger, that starts like a tiger, using claw to claw the face or the beak of the claim to the eyes. This is somewhat a movement involved.”

Interviewer:

“Thank you very much.”

Bruce Lee:

“Thank you very much.”




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