The transcript below is from the video “Bodybuilder VS Skinny Arms – Which One Hits Better?” by MindSmash.

MindSmash (Martial Arts Are A Microcosm Of The World):

When you see a bodybuilder with fully jacked arms, what’s the first feeling most of us feel? “Wow, he has to be powerful”. Naturally, the image given off by large muscle mass is usually one of power that establishes respect. But is that true? Does large muscle mass mean more powerful thus more dangerous? What if I can show you an example of a skinny 130 lbs man hitting 30 percent harder than a fully dench bodybuilder? That would definitely throw a wrench into what we intuitively believe… Large muscles do not mean more power. They can help power, but for the most part, they usually contribute to an illusion of power… If you join me on this segment as we take a closer glance, you’ll know exactly why.

MindSmash (Martial Arts Are A Microcosm Of The World):

Hello! Here we have a bodybuilder trying his best to impress a crowd, not just with his aesthetics, but hopefully, with his power as well. Unfortunately for him, his results over and over end up very lackluster. Naturally, this affects the man’s ego and there appears to be a disconnect between his physical appearance and how hard he feels he should hit based on that physical appearance. After all, he looks strong. His physique emanates strength. So then, why is he hitting the machine so weak? He ends up frustrated even to a point where he starts blaming the machine. That’s pretty classic.

MindSmash (Martial Arts Are A Microcosm Of The World):

Instead of acknowledging the illusion, he feels much better clinging to it by blaming something else. In this instant, it’s not his lack of technique or muscle mass, built flow considering its functionality. It’s the machine. He evolved on this to an extent. Deflecting, ‘You know I’ve done this too.’ But the irony becomes that we give our power away by not taking responsibility, by not acknowledging that sure, we aren’t perfect. Not I, not anyone. Biting down on that mouthpiece and acknowledging that maybe we are missing something, yet allows space for improvement. You cannot teach anyone unwilling to learn anything.

MindSmash (Martial Arts Are A Microcosm Of The World):

But a person who’s decided to learn, they cannot be stopped from their process. This is a law of the universe. I do not know why. But I assure you, anyone, regardless of who you are, or where you are from, even if you look like a sheep herder, as Genghis Khan did, if you commit yourself to learning, if you have both that humbleness and passion in your heart, you will find a way to teach yourself even if a teacher does not present himself. With that said, what is this man missing then? After all, if he looks this big and powerful, he must be right. That’s always been an illusion by taking a glance at the surface, we make up an assumption that is not congruent with reality and when we take a closer glance, we begin to understand why.

MindSmash (Martial Arts Are A Microcosm Of The World):

Watch this here. Sean O’Malley fights at 135. He’s a bantam weight, much smaller, lanky, and at this time, he might’ve still been vegan. Nonetheless though, he’s ability to generate force on the punch machine, is significantly greater. Just look at the physical difference between these two men. But here, Sean O’Malley consistently outperformed this big aesthetics man. Why? Sean O’Malley isn’t even known for being a power puncher, that’s the thing. But nevertheless though, he has a significant advantage when it comes to his over-all body mechanics. Watch how the body builder loads up heavily flaring his elbow narrow rotation emphasizing his strike. He tries to force the punch from his pectoral muscle, forcing from his tricep, really discharges arm strength into that punch.

MindSmash (Martial Arts Are A Microcosm Of The World):

Watch that again. He actively raised his arm. Off the bat, you can tell he doesn’t have a feel for the proper technique. Instead, he’s consciously trying to force the punch from his arm. The philosophy when doing strikes is to envision your fist as a five-pound rock and to treat your arm like a whip to a lax seed. Then when you feel that kinetic as you load into that whip, through your body’s rotations, snap your five-pound rock off of that. This basically means a punch has little to do with arm strength and everything to do with how efficient your kinetic chain is, harnessing the momentum from your legs to rotating from the ground up into a disassociated or whip-like arm. Do you now see why? It’s an illusion now. The great trick is that you believe this person must hit hard because of his massive arms. But, to force a punch from your arm is what makes it ineffective.

MindSmash (Martial Arts Are A Microcosm Of The World):

That’s exactly what you see here. Kinetic energy generated by one’s feet lost due to poor kinetic linking. Why? He’s focusing too much on plowing the machine with his arm when in truth, it comes from the legs. He has played the trick, not just on us, but on himself. With that said, does that mean big, aesthetic muscle mass is bad? No, not necessarily. They will never be a substitute for good form and technique and efficient kinetic chain orchestrated by strong body mechanics. But, when you do have the form down, you’ve been stretching properly, your brain-muscle communication is fluid, and you’re training for explosiveness, taking into consideration efficient use of your kinetic chain, the result from there is what you see in the other side of the coin.




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