The transcript below is from the video “Bruce Lee’s Judo move set” by Chadi.

Chadi (Martial Arts Topics, History, and the Forgotten Legends of these Beautiful Arts):

“Hi! This is Chadi. And today it’s going to be Bruce Lee, one of the most influential philosophers and martial artists and filmmakers that ever lived. His philosophy pertaining martial arts and everything in life about rejecting what is useless constantly evolving and adapting and having an open mind to adding something new. And also rejecting something that we already have in case we realize that it’s not something benefiting us. So, his philosophy is pretty much similar to Kyuzo Mifune, but a name far more different way of elaborating it.”

Chadi (Martial Arts Topics, History, and the Forgotten Legends of these Beautiful Arts):

“So, the first example that we have here is against Judo Gene LeBell and here he goes for an ogoshi. He backflips and then continues it with a Sutemi-waza, which is the tomoe nage. Very similar to Kyuzo Mifune against his students, but there is a strike involved and here a classical tomoe nage throwing Judo Gene LeBell. Tomoe nage is a classical judo jiujutsu throw. It is arguably one of my favorites, uh, highly effective and of catching people off guard and being done at the beginner and the high level. You have also the yoko tomoe nage, or the side circular throw. Very, uh, effective in both judo and BJJ in case of pulling guard or you know, throwing in order to continuing on the ground for newaza. Here you can see there are many variations of the yoko tomoe nage and the tomoe nage in general. And like I said, one of the most effective, even Simba used it to throw Scar down the fire pit. So, tomoe nage is the first one against the legendary, uh, Gene LeBell in the movie.”

Chadi (Martial Arts Topics, History, and the Forgotten Legends of these Beautiful Arts):

“So, the next one being the okuri ashi harai, in this jeet kune do demonstration, uh, sliding foot sweep, sweeping and blowing through both legs. Uh, okuri ashi harai also one of the basics and classics of judo. Highly effective. Requires a lot of timing and concentration. Here he had his eyes closed showing how much he can feel the movement and that’s what okuri ashi harai consists of. So, if you watched or know a little bit about the nage no kata. It has sections, uh, te-waza, koshi-waza, ashi-waza, atemi-waza, yoko sutemi-waza. And here in the ashi-waza, the first technique you ever do, uh, and the nage no kata, is the okuri ashi harai, the sliding foot sweep, you see you slide the foot towards the other and then blow them off, uh, taking okay completely off balance and onto the ground. Do not be confused with deashi-harai, which is advancing foot sweep. So, here you see this is the ashi harai, sweeping of the leg that’s leading forward and not going through slide towards the other leg. So, okuri ashi harai, one of the greatest. And here, he does it blindfolded so showing how he feels the movement and, uh, requires good timing and he has it. So, Bruce Lee a legend.”

Chadi (Martial Arts Topics, History, and the Forgotten Legends of these Beautiful Arts):

“The next one here being like karate is the o soto gari. Very much in a karate-like manner of o soto gari. Again, one of the basics and classical of judo, jiujitsu and many grappling arts around the world. It’s a white bell throw. You learn it as a white belt. Now, I’m not saying you master it as a white belt but in the white belt curriculum the o soto gari is there is arguably the first throw that you will ever learn is the o soto gari with the concepts of kuzushi so on and so forth.”

Chadi (Martial Arts Topics, History, and the Forgotten Legends of these Beautiful Arts):

“So, the next one is here you have the ko soto gari or the minor outer reap. He is on the outside and reaps away of the leg. Here you go to the side, outside and then you just blow through the leg sliding forward. Bruce Lee does it swiftly. Here you can see it in the judo context, uh, Bruce Lee grabbed the arm rather than the kimono or the judo gi. Here you see a morote-gari with a punch to the groin. Again, one of the old and classical. I’ve shown this technique many times whether it is in the context of MMA, freestyle wrestling and here in judo. Back in 2010 it was still legal, um, now, it is not but nonetheless it is one of the 67 throws of judo. Bruce Lee here does it in the context of striking and mixed martial arts.”

Chadi (Martial Arts Topics, History, and the Forgotten Legends of these Beautiful Arts):

“So, here you have, uh, countering the kick with a big swift sukui nage. Uh, sukui nage is a scooping throw. It is very clear that Rusi was scooping up. Some might argue that this is a te guruma. I would say this is more of a sukui nage, scooping up the kick as it’s coming to him. And then here like this one and taking down. I would argue this is a sukui nage. It’s a scooping throw, also it’s illegal now.

The next one here against Chuck Norris, uh, it can be done either way. If you like lock the neck and then you know break it, this is considered like one of the old, uh, osa hishigi, or the crushing hole or in case you’re targeting the trachea and chocking, this is a my, uh, hadaka jime. It’s a choke.”

Chadi (Martial Arts Topics, History, and the Forgotten Legends of these Beautiful Arts):

“So, this the other one is a spine lock. Here you see lift a shoulder wheel, a big shoulder wheel the kata guruma. Now there’s a league ‘legal variation’ of the kata guruma, but nonetheless it is one of these old, uh, wrestling techniques. Jigoro Kano added it to his arsenal back when he couldn’t defeat a sumo wrestler. It’s a very interesting story about how he studied western wrestling in order to add it.

Now, here this one is a bit tricky it looks like he’s doing an armbar, but here as he’s curling, uh, it looks like he’s doing like ude garami stretch out. But he was grabbing his own, uh, try forearm rather than the other guy’s wrists. So, it was a bit weird. Here you can see the juji gatame on someone who’s doing a juji gatame. Also, one of the basics of old submission grappling. The armbar it is found in many, um, civilizations. The armbar the ude hishigi gatame. Again, one of the classics. Here you saw in the pictures Bruce Lee demonstrating it, uh, he was a very open-minded martial artist, constantly adding to his arsenal of striking and grappling, as well.”

Chadi (Martial Arts Topics, History, and the Forgotten Legends of these Beautiful Arts):

“Here you see a makikomi. Very rarely used but nonetheless, Bruce Lee did use it. It is incredibly impressive. You can see it in competition in judo all the time. You don’t see it much else unless it’s, uh, chidaoba wrestling of Georgia. But everything else like jiujitsu etc. Maybe sambo but in judo it is very popular, uh, the makikomi.

The next one here against Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, he’s doing a, uh, kata gatame. He got reversed but here you see is also one of the classical pins of judo, the kata gatame. And I would say it’s my favorite pin to use in judo. It looks very aesthetically pleasing and also, um, the less contact. Uh, actually the contact as Travis Stevens puts it, it’s actually with the, with your side, your ribs and your waist. And it is not with your, uh, hips, because they look separated. So, it’s not like an arm triangle you’re choking but rather you are remaining with contacts with your contact, with your torso on uki side. So, it is highly effective. Minimal contact but it holds down perfectly. Here you see this is a ushiro hadaka jime, a rear naked choke. Here he looks like he’s doing hane-goshi almost.”

Chadi (Martial Arts Topics, History, and the Forgotten Legends of these Beautiful Arts):

“So, this was Bruce Lee a very interesting arsenal of techniques. If you have anything else to add especially regarding that MMA match in the black trunks, it looks like he’s doing juji kata jime but switched to ude garami. Almost but didn’t look like it’s locked. So, if you have anything else to add, let me know down below.

This was Chadi and thank you for listening.”




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