The transcript below is from the video “Bruce Lee’s Son vs Bolo Yeung | Jeet Kune Do vs KungFu” by Brutal TV.

Brutal TV:

Brandon Lee vs Bolo Yeung

Fighting, whether sanctioned or no holds barred, is without a doubt the oldest form of competition that mankind has ever engaged in. At times, it has been a necessary tool of survival, kill or be killed, that has proved an extremely effective motivation and crucible for enhancing mankind’s fighting prowess and nowhere is appreciation for the beauty of fighting more apparent than in the wide story genre of martial arts cinema. Violence is the selling point of these films but seeing as that violence is achieved through trickery, stunt work and movie magic, it’s not truly the audience’s bloodlust that drives the industry. In this video, we are going to take a look at two martial artists who took their fighting techniques to the big screen – Brandon Lee and Bolo Yeung. We will also try and answer the question – who would win in a street fight?

Brutal TV:

But before we do this, remember to give us a thumbs up and a quick click on our subscribe button to get more videos like this one and support Brutal TV. Thanks but for now, let’s go back to Lee and Yeung.

Firstly, let’s take a closer look at Brandon Lee, the son of Chinese martial arts teacher and action movie star, Bruce Lee. Brandon was born on February 1, 1965 in Oakland, California. And as soon as he could walk, he was practicing martial arts. Brandon was trained in Bruce’s own style of Kung Fu, Jeet Kune Do which was a hybrid style that Bruce pulled together from many Chinese and other martial arts disciplines. By the time Brandon was 6, he could destroy a wooden board with a single kick.

Brutal TV:

After his father’s untimely death, Brandon continued his training and development in Los Angeles with Bruce’s former proteges Dan Inosanto and Richard Bustillo. He also began taking up fighting styles like Muay Thai, Wrestling, Jiu-jitsu and Boxing and he soon integrated these into his own personal style. In other words, Brandon Lee was born to be a martial arts master.

Although martial arts was in his blood, it was acting that Brandon really had his heart set on but not in martial arts films like his father. After being kicked out of two high schools and dropping out of a third, he eventually went on to study theater at Emerson College for a year before attending the famous Lee Strasberg Theatre & Film Institute in New York, the home of method acting.

Brutal TV:

Initially staying away from martial arts films, Lee eventually embraced his heritage. In 1986, he made his first feature film Legacy of Rage in Hong Kong which was in Cantonese, a language he knew since childhood. After this time, Lee appeared in Kung Fu, the movie with David Carradine which aired on television. He played a deadly assassin and his powerful fight scenes made quite an impression on viewers. Returning to the big screen, Lee made three action films Laser Mission in 1990, Showdown in Little Tokyo with Dolph Lundgren in 1991 and Rapid Fire with Powers Boothe in 1992.

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With his career on an upswing, Lee signed on to play Eric Draven in The Crow based on the comic book James Obar. In the film, his character is a murdered rock musician who comes back from the dead to take his revenge on the gang that killed him and his girlfriend. Unfortunately, there were a series of mishaps during the course of shooting, starting with the first day when a crew member was almost electrocuted. Toward the end of the production, Lee was performing his death scene for the film when he was struck by a bullet that had been lodged in the prop gun that was only supposed to be a blank. This was to cause his premature death.

We’re now at the halfway mark, so just a reminder to like this video and subscribe to Brutal TV for more top quality fighting videos. Now, back to our two fighters.

Brutal TV:

Now, for a closer look at Yang Sze better known as Bolo Yeung. Yeung was born on July 3, 1946, in the suburbs of Canton in Mainland China. As a 10-year-old in Canton, Bolo studied under many Kung Fu masters and also learned acrobatics and started weight training. He eventually became a Mainland China power lifting champion. In the 60s, to escape communism and seek a new life and new opportunities, the young Yang Sze swam from China to Hong Kong. He then began teaching bodybuilding. At this time, Bolo Yeung came to the attention of Sir Run Run Shaw’s Shaw Brothers Organization and he got several film roles playing burly muscular villains. Of course, the bigger he got physically, the bigger the roles he was given and the more monstrous his on-screen persona became.

Brutal TV:

Whilst at Shaw Brothers, he continued to develop his martial arts skills. He particularly developed a love for Tai Chi. He continued to build himself up and in 1970, became Mr. Hong Kong bodybuilding champion. He was chosen by Bruce Lee to play Bolo, the top fighter of drug bear and master Han in the Kung Fu classic Enter the Dragon in 1973. This film was to be where he acquired his new name and also developed a close friendship with Bruce Lee. Bolo Yeung starred in hundreds of Kung Fu films through the 70s and 80s and was regularly killed by the likes of Bruce Lee. Although his skills were actually far more advanced than any single discipline, he humbly says that he felt in terms of Kung Fu, he could not compare with Bruce Lee.

Brutal TV:

His big break came in 1988 when he co-starred as Chong Li in Bloodsport. For many people, Bolo Yeung was the real star of this film and several others, including Double Impact and Tiger Claws. He was inevitably cast as an invincible monster of almost supernatural prowess who dwarfed such contenders as Jean-Claude Van Damme and Brandon Lee in climatic David vs Goliath duels which he had to lose because they were the heroes. For Legacy of Rage, he had to spend several weeks training Brandon Lee so the younger star would appear to be a worthy opponent. Bolo Yeung regularly booked the gym for 9 am sessions to tie in with his own regime but often Brandon would not turn up till 12. Brandon explained that he had been out dancing till the early hours and was only training under protest because the producers insisted. Bolo Yeung went on to have a long and successful career in the film industry and still trains regularly at the age of 75.

Brutal TV:

So, who out of these two fighters would win at the peak of their careers in a street fight? In our opinion, there really is no contest. It has to be Bolo. Brandon Lee really was passionate about acting and not quite as passionate about martial arts. Of course, he was Bruce Lee’s son and it goes without saying that he was talented when it came to fighting but his acting career was what mattered most to him, whereas Bolo Yeung took his training of martial arts and bodybuilding very seriously. The only reason he lost fights in films was down to the role he was playing. Given the opportunity to show what he could do in real life, we have no doubt that Bolo Yeung would use all that muscle to his advantage and be the outright winner.

Who do you think would win this fight? Do you have a favorite out of the two? Tell us in the comments section below and don’t forget to like and subscribe to Brutal TV for more top fighting videos just like this one. Thanks for watching. We’ll see you next time.




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