Viking Samurai:

Yeah, let’s start these questions though because we, like I said, man, there’s so much to talk about. But let’s give it to the audience and we might have covered some of this stuff. I’m just gonna go down the list. Oh, Bruce Lee will start with, I’ve heard you on another interview but in this kind I was asking that, you know, you do a great Bruce Lee impression. Can you share that with us?

Bey Logan (Producer, Actor & Writer):

Sure. You know, I mean, you know, bamboo salt is very flexible, very much alive. There you’ll be a world of hurt baby. That’s it. Don’t think. Feel like a finger pulling away to the moon.

Viking Samurai:

That’s great, man. If they do a Bruce Lee cartoon or a video game…

Bey Logan (Producer, Actor & Writer):

I did. Well, I did the voice for the Japanese version of Game of Death and a Japanese typing game. So I was briefly like the world’s third most popular Bruce Lee verbal impersonator. I’d used to do it from long long hours of listening to the interview, the famous one with, let’s say, Ted Thomas interview, where he was like, you know, I don’t believe… it was with the other fellow when he goes I don’t believe in the word star, man. It’s an illusion, something the public call you. But yeah, his way of talking, it was so unique, wasn’t it?

Viking Samurai:

Yeah, very cool, man. Very cool. Okay. Oh, here’s something. So, on your DVD commentary of The Big Boss starring Bruce Lee, had mentioned that a former Muay Thai fighter turned coach was on set and was egged on by the extras to test Bruce. You had said that in your research that Bruce hit the Muay Thai coach so hard that he earned the coaches respect. Now, here’s the question – how were you able to conduct all the research and would you be willing to name sources?

Bey Logan (Producer, Actor & Writer):

Absolutely! By the way, you know what, who probably knows more about Big Boss day by day shooting than I do now would be my dear friend Steve Carriage. But I can tell you the research I did because this is going back a few years for the commentary and then I did other research for my Bruce Lee and I book. But yeah, it was from talking to those guys, the stunt guys; Lam Ching-ying, Peter Chan Lung, Chan Wui-ngai, who else was on there? Although when I came to Hong Kong, all those guys were still working in the industry. I had all of their phone numbers. So if I wanted to find and I speak Cantonese, so if I wanted to find out what happened, I would call one of them up. It’s like, for my Jackie Chan book. I’m working on a book on Jackie at the moment. We had like [inaudible] come in the office the other day. But yeah, I mean, I think as I said before, you know, I have an unfair advantage as a filmmaker myself and if somebody’s been around so long, I can talk to the people directly. So, my sources were the people on the set.

Bey Logan (Producer, Actor & Writer):

And the context was often not even a formal interview where I would say we are now going to be, you know, on the record. But we’d be making a movie maybe, like Peter Chan Lung and I’m trying to remember, I think Chan Wui-ngai, Peter Chan Lung, [inaudible], they were all on circus kits in China. So Peter Chan, I know I spoke to there but it was like, would you be sitting on the side of the set at like, you know, 2 a.m and that kind of conversation, you know. And then, I only interviewed Lam Ching-ying one time but that was in a, you know, more conventional interview situation. And who else and Chan Wui-ngai is probably the one I know the best. And he was, I saw him just like a few months ago. Yeah. So, no, I mean, it was all first hand. Most of the stuff I talk about in the commentaries, it’s from people who, you know, sadly of course, I can’t ask Bruce. But everybody else who was alive I talked to directly. And the language thing is a big thing. I mean, again, I’m always a bit surprised there are these experts on the Hong Kong film but very few of them seem to speak Chinese or read Chinese. And I’m thinking of something of a barrier. I mean, even for me, I started when I was like 30. So I mean, my Cantonese is okay. I can do interviews in the language. I can get by but you could be better than me, you know. I mean, we had a guy’s Julian Gaertner, an actor who was in a film like they called, Vixen. He learned to speak Cantonese, Mandarin and read and write Chinese when he came in the industry as an actor. So there’s no excuse. So, that was the short answer. Basically, I spoke to the stunt guys directly and they told me that was one of the incidents that happened.

Viking Samurai:

Okay. Oh, here’s one. Why can’t we get the color print of Bruce Lee’s Orphan that plays on Hong Kong TV released on Home Media in the United States?

Bey Logan (Producer, Actor & Writer):

Well, I mean, firstly, I suppose somebody in America, like a studio or distribution company would have to think that there was enough value to pay what the Hong Kong company would want for the rights, such a precious, you know, footage. I mean, when I was doing various documentaries over the years, we’d go to TVB which is the biggest television company in Hong Kong and just licensing clips. They don’t have any footage, unfortunately, of Bruce Lee demonstrating on TV anymore. They seem to have wiped all of that but they had clips from the funeral and they tried to make us pay an arm and a leg for that. So, god knows what somebody would want for a full movie starring Bruce Lee. So obviously, their estimation has a value. Now, you go to an American distribution company and I mean, I don’t know, David, do you really think that that is a mainstream release in America that’s going to make a lot of money?

Viking Samurai:

I never have… no problem.

Bey Logan (Producer, Actor & Writer):

No but I mean, I can understand the Bruce Lee fans going, we want to see it and I get that. But from an American point of view, I’m just going from a business point of view, I don’t know if that would sell enough to warrant it being, what the ask price would be and then of course, you have to do a restoration probably and then you’ve got to do all the marketing and everything. You’re probably going to lose money on it.

Viking Samurai:

Yeah.

Bey Logan (Producer, Actor & Writer):

So that, I think it’s the problem. The other thing, and I noticed one of your, what viewers mentioned was the idea that the Hong Kong companies sometimes want an unrealistic amount of money. That’s actually very true and I remember when I was at Media Asia trying to get the rights I think for The Orphan for us to distribute in Asia, and the story was that the woman who owned the rights was on a worldwide tour a trip, like a cruise, couldn’t be reached and so the rights were going to be sitting there until she came back. I can’t remember what happened in the end but those are the kind of things that you used to be content with. It’s quite difficult.

Viking Samurai:

Yeah. Oh, here we go. Any developments on the infamous lost log footage with Dan Inosanto in Game of Death?

Bey Logan (Producer, Actor & Writer):

I think if it was around ever, it went down with the Golden Harvest Studios. I mean, I took out a shitload of stuff from Golden Harvest posters, lobby cards, anything that wasn’t nailed down which I have in my place now. And sell it on www.realease.com. But anyway, I had all that stuff but I think there was film footage stock, there was stuff that was stashed away nobody knew what it was. It was a miracle I found the Game of Death stuff. It was just luck. What I think happened, I talked about it in my book, is that they were preparing to do the Bruce Lee: The Man of the Legend documentary and they had a Mandarin version and an English version. The Mandarin version has been lost but the English version has survived and they actually took the original negative.

Bey Logan (Producer, Actor & Writer):

I mean, it’s hard to believe, the original negative of Game of Death of that scene, imagining that it would never be used and they cut it in half and they put the half of Dan fighting fist to fist with Yuen into the English version and the weapons, the log footage on into the Mandarin version, then the Mandarin version was lost. That’s what I think and you know, I’m very open to, you know, someone like Steve Carriage again, who I mean, everything I know about Bruce Lee is in my book Bruce Lee and I. I just did another documentary actually about Bruce Lee for a Big Studio in America but it’s not something where I devote every waking moment. I mean, Steve Carriage, every waking moment is Bruce Lee or Thai Boxing. So, you know, I’m not that dedicated and focused. So he may have more information than me but my belief is that’s what happened and as I look at it now, I think it’s unlikely that that footage will resurface, knowing what I know about the way preservation or lack of preservation.

Bey Logan (Producer, Actor & Writer):

Look, when I did the DVD and blu-ray of SPL/ Kill Zone for I think it was the British market because I released it in both markets for different companies. But when we did it in England, I wanted to get the deleted scenes from that movie and Donnie had deleted the deleted scenes. So, I mean, if you think about that, you know, I had to go to Kenji Tanigaki, his action director had shot them on his, like, home video camera. So we cut them together from that but the footage as it was in the film, he destroyed it. Same thing with Daniel Lee on Dragon Squad, he destroyed it. So if you think that’s what’s happening to movies today, I haven’t helped anybody trying to find something from 1972. So, I understand why it matters a lot to… Look, it’s like the… okay, when I found all of the dailies that survived of Bruce Lee in Game of Death, if you were a Bruce Lee fan, if one of that group of cognoscenti, this was incredibly exciting. If you’re one of the mainstream audiences, you didn’t really care.

Bey Logan (Producer, Actor & Writer):

It was just more shots of him in a yellow suit, fighting the same guys he fought in the original, in the 1978 version and they probably thought the 1978 version was pretty entertaining, the one with all the, you know, Gig Young and Dean Jagger and everything. They probably liked that, the mainstream audiences, I mean. You know, the worldwide, you know, the kind of the ordinary audience. And then you’ve got this base of fans who were like, wow, this is so amazing. And I think it’s when, you know, dear old John Little did his documentary Warrior’s Journey, it really didn’t do the business they hoped because not enough people really cared about it. And I think it’s the same with all of these like odd bits of footage, the fan base like, oh my god, we’ve got to find it. We’ve got to find it. And unfortunately, over the years, the industry, the people here never preserve materials, never took it that seriously.




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