The transcript below is from the video “Exposing Fake Martial Artists Pretending To Be Real” by ALL CE.

ALL CE:

Imagine getting into a fight with someone who knows martial arts or their seemingly perfect stance and form. Would you run away even if you are not sure that they are an actual martial artist?

Throughout the history of the sport, many people who looked like the real deal were actually in fact an imposter. Before we introduce you to some of the world’s most well-known martial arts phonies, make sure to click the subscribe button and turn on the notification bell.

ALL CE:

American actor Steven Seagal was the biggest martial arts star in Hollywood in his heyday. But make no mistake, his bravado and movies and television are just for show. Although Seagal was the first American to teach Aikido in Japan, it’s very much an impractical form of martial arts. According to UFC commentator Joe Rogan, Aikido would never work against a trained fighter. Never. Not in a million years.

Aside from that, Seagal created a stir back in 2011 after taking the credit for Anderson Silva’s front kick to the face by Vitor Belford during their match. Anderson, who was widely considered to be the greatest mixed martial artist on the planet at that time, denied Seagal’s claims. Although Seagal had escorted Silva to the ring that night, the UFC fighter vehemently denied that Seagal was the one who taught him that move.

ALL CE:

Another martial artist, Ronda Rousey’s trainer, Gene LeBell allegedly got into an altercation with Seagal while filming “Out for Justice”, a movie that starred and was produced by Seagal. Jokingly, Seagal claimed that he was immune to being choked out because of his Aikido training. LeBell then allegedly placed his arms around Seagal’s neck and once Seagal said go he then proceeded to put him in a choke hold until Seagal went unconscious. The funny thing is that Seagal allegedly lost control of his bowels during the altercation with LeBell.

ALL CE:

If you’re into 90s action movies, there’s a good chance that you’ve seen Jean-Claude Van Damme in his movie “Bloodsport”, which was supposedly based on martial artist Frank Dux’s unverified story. Dux was allegedly trained to be a ninja when he was a teenager by a ninjutsu expert named Senzo Tanaka. He then later established his own school called Dux Ryu Ninjutsu. He also claimed that he won a secret martial arts tournament called the Kumite in 1975. Dux also claimed that he was sent on covert missions to South-east Asia as a member of the U.S Marine Corps reserve and has been awarded the medal of honor. He also asserted that he was recruited by former CIA director William J. Casey to work as a covert agent. Although Dux really did serve in the U.S Marine Corps, his record showed that he was never sent overseas and has not received any awards. He later on said that the military sabotaged his records to discredit him.

ALL CE:

Most of us think that New York is where the best and brightest work for the top companies in the world. But in 2015 legitimate Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu player Mike “The Power House” Palladino exposed a man named Jay Queiroz who ran a training facility in Marlboro, New York. Queiroz claimed himself to be a Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu black belt under the GFTEAM. But thankfully, Palladino paid a visit to Queiroz facility and exposed his fake credentials. Queiroz was not only a terrible teacher but also a fake black belt. It turns out Queiroz was only a purple belt.

ALL CE:

Pretending to be a martial artist is one thing but claiming that you can knock out an opponent without touching them is just preposterous. American martial arts instructor and author George Dillman is still promoting no-touch knockouts, Qi knockouts, an increasing technique effectiveness based on sound and color. Although his claims are not scientifically proven, Dillman still promoted the use of it in September 2015. National Geographic channel challenged Dillman to demonstrate his knockout qi and guess what, it failed to knock out Luigi Garlaschelli, an Italian skeptical investigator. According to Dillman, Garlaschelli was a non-believer and his tongue was in the wrong position which nullified his power. Dillman might have claimed that he could knock out an opponent without touching him.

ALL CE:

But Yanagi Ryuken claimed himself a psychic. Yanagi’s assumed ability to manipulate physical objects without touching them stems not from his martial arts background but rather from his psychic power. Yanagi was highly respected in Japan and welcomed all those who challenged his claim. In 2006, 35-year-old Japanese journalist and political activist who was trained in Judo, Karate and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, Iwakura Tsuyoshi repeatedly punched Yanagi in the mouth while he was kneeling on the floor. Failing to defend himself, the then 65-year-old Yanagi stated that his illness impaired his key energy and psychic abilities. Despite losing the match, he still continued to teach, which attracted more students.

Have you seen a fake martial artist pretending to be a real one? Let us know in the comments section below. Don’t forget to like, share and subscribe to A-C-E: All Clear Entertainment.




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