The transcript below is from the video “How Long Does It Take To Learn Wing Chun?” by Greenville Academy of Martial Arts.

Greenville Academy of Martial Arts:

Wing Chun Kung Fu is a highly effective and efficient martial art system. To master it would take a life time (maybe more than one), but how long before a Wing Chun practitioner is good enough to use what they’ve learned for the purpose of self defense? Sifu Jason gives you the answer to the question “How Long Does It Take To Learn Wing Chun?” by giving his thoughts on what a beginner should focus on during the early parts of their training.

Sifu Jason Korol (Greenville Academy of Martial Arts):

How Long Does It Take To Learn Wing Chun? How long before you can use Wing Chun for you self-defence? Well how smart are you? Okay, but seriously, I’ll give you my answer. I think you should be able to get really good at it from 6 months and under- and that’s going to go by what’s your definition of it is.

Now if you’re using Wing Chun as a self-defence system, the key to Wing Chun is the simplest thing. In particular, the ‘straight punch’, the ‘straight kick’ and the foot work. Those issues makes Wing Chun unique. I covered this in a book I wrote called “Wing Chun for the Modern Warrior”. I covered that because the ‘fourth Wing Chun form’ is unique because it’s designed to be used in environments that aren’t sporty.

Sifu Jason Korol (Greenville Academy of Martial Arts):

The floors that we have here is expensive- each of these mats are well over a hundred bucks. That’s not something that you’re going to have in a sudden and unavoidable violent encounter- you’re going to be in a stairwell, parking lot, curbs, sidewalks, cluttered rooms or offices. So you’re going to need a foot work system that’s going to help you navigate that. Plus, you need a striking system that’s going to help you do that as well. So you need to have the foot work that’s moving you around, making you a hard target to hit- so you have an offensive defence. The best defence is good offence, the best offence is a ‘counter clock’ because it delivers defence in the offence.

So all of that is one package deal. You should be getting that on the first day. The way we see it, that’s what you should be getting first day. You come in through the doors, you should be getting the training sense that gives you the key to understanding that. We have some online curriculum where we go over that, where it’s all designed to enhanced and develop the body to feel the mechanics of that.

Sifu Jason Korol (Greenville Academy of Martial Arts):

The three big keys once again: foot work, striking, punch and straight kick will make you a formidable self-defender and if you put the time in for it, you can get very good at that within 6 months or so.

Now I’ve been doing this since 1981, there’s still a lot of things that I’m doing and learning in Wing Chun-it’s fantastic. So you can say that it’s a lifetime to master it but we’re talking about learn it’ll take to get effective with it and use it. You know what it think? No one really masters it.

Sifu Jason Korol (Greenville Academy of Martial Arts):

I think there could be some conflating of terms there and that’s very dangerous for us, as instructors, we might want to keep people down- kind of swing them along- to keep them going. I met one guy, he was doing Wing Chun for 4-5 years. From what I understood, he’s a hardworking guy, he’s in shape, he’s respectful and they hadn’t shown him the second form because they had to wait as it was the tradition. I respectfully disagree with that. I think that’s a wrong thing to do, I think that’s not being honourable to students. You’re supposed to be getting the information to students the best you can. My Wing Chun master 20 years ago said to me one time that when he dies, if all his students aren’t better than him- he’s made the system worse. So as an instructor, I want to get that information out to people as fast as I can, in a quality of a way I can.

Sifu Jason Korol (Greenville Academy of Martial Arts):

You guys have seen Randy on film here. That dude basically lived at school and he was in 6-7 days a week training. He got very good, very very fast. He had told some people he knew around and they’re like “oh, you can’t learn Wing Chun that fast” and he’s like “Well, I did!” That’s just the mentality of the school.

Obviously if you’re in a school or with an instructor that’s much more reticent to do that, then I apologize for that. But, I’m drawing a distinction between how long it take for you to get effective and how long does it take to master it-  those two terms are separate. You should be effective in your system in 6 months and under. You should have the time and the muscle memory to make you very hard to work against because wherever you go, there’s a lot of knuckles and the bottom of your heels flashing at somebody’s legs, hips, knees and so forth. That’s going to make you a formidable opponent as a self-defender and you could do that right away.

Sifu Jason Korol (Greenville Academy of Martial Arts):

The best, really one of the best tools in Muay Thai is the “push-kick”. See it more often because it does make kind of a defensive fight and they don’t want defensive fight, they want more dramatic and more sports matches. I had a Muay Thai coach back in the 80s when I was learning and I asked him about that, because he told me if you get really good at “push-kick”, you can keep someone off of you a whole day. So, I went, “why don’t we use it more?” and he said, “well, it’s because you need an exciting fight to bring the crowd in. So a lot of guys are going to bring in the round kick more because it’s going to be a bit more tantalising for the crowd”. So that being said, I don’t think you want to your self-defences to be like a reality show. You want it to be like: Number 1: You beat the crap out of him. Number 2: He beats the crap out of you. Number 3: You beat the crap out of each other.

Sifu Jason Korol (Greenville Academy of Martial Arts):

Defensive struggles are not fun to watch. You want to make sure that you’re standing behind your cover. If you understand Wing Chun this way, think of it in terms of gun firing. In gun firing, you’re moving and firing. You’re trying to get cover because the primary objective is to not get shot. You’re trying to move and get cover. In Wing Chun, you’re doing the same with where your legs and hands go. I’m moving and firing, everywhere I go, I’m stepping and hitting. So there’s a wall of fire coming at you and I’m mobile. When something is coming, I’m trying to get out of the way and fire- it’s the same thing when there’s a gun fire. Hope that makes sense to you and clears the way because Wing Chun has got a lot of cool information and people miss what’s most important because if it.

Sifu Jason Korol (Greenville Academy of Martial Arts):

Lastly, if you look at Gan Sau or Kwan Sau, those techniques are not nearly as important as punching, kicking or your basic footwork. You can have a great punch, kick and footwork and a not so good Gan Sau, you’re still an effective self-defender; but not the other way around. If you’re really good with Kwan Sau, you’re not going to win a fight with Kwan Sau or Gan Sau. You can be great at that but you need the other things first and you can get them right away. Train them. Make sure you get so good at them that you can stop and think about if you’re doing them wrong-then you’re a good self-defender. You can get started today.




Watch The Video Below!

Train Hard, Fight Easy!

Wall Bag