Logan Lo:

“He does a pass, a slash. He comes out here, does another slash and controls here. Note that he’s behind the person, he’s not only flanked. He’s completely behind his assailant. And using the assailant’s body as a shield against the other assailants.

Hello People of The Internet! Welcome back to another episode of Scenic Fights’ – Fight Scenes Breakdown. I’m Logan Lo.”

Chad Vázquez:

“And I’m Chad Vázquez.”

Logan Lo:

“Before we get into the episode, we just wanted to say thanks to all our new subscribers…”

Chad Vázquez:

“And old ones.”

Logan Lo:

“And our old ones. Thank you so much for all of your support. We’re honestly floored by all of it. We’re really appreciative. So, today’s episode is actually probably our most requested episode.”

Chad Vázquez:

“Yes. Yes, it is.”

Logan Lo:

“So, we’ve gotten Instagram messages about it. We’ve gotten Facebook messages about it.”

Chad Vázquez:

“Some scary text, I don’t know how you guys got our numbers.”

Logan Lo:

“Some scary text, that’s been scary. But we’re really excited about this, this is actually one of my favorite films. ‘The Man from Nowhere’ (2010). And it’s so good, that there are actually two great knife scenes that we’ll be doing. The first one is going to be the melee fight scene with the protagonist, Cha against a group of individuals. So, let’s get right to it.”

Chad Vázquez:

“Yup let’s do it!”

Logan Lo:

“Let’s do it.

Logan Lo:

Alright nice, fight’s beginning. Good. Oh!”

Chad Vázquez:

“Boom, forward roll!”

Logan Lo:

“Nice. Good, dragging. I like that. I like that. Just the very beginning of this, there’s lots of things that I like. The first thing I like is that he’s not hunting the body. You see that a lot in movies where people are always trying to hunt the bodies. But as a lot of you have commented before, about my saying, ‘Oh, make mincemeat of the person’, which I would never do, in real life. But if I was in a fight, you want to cut the extremities first. One thing that he did was that he cut the tendons here. So, he’s cutting tendons to weaken the man’s grip. Because again, this is how you grip. You grip with this side of the arm and then you open with this side of the arm. So, he cut here so that the man was no longer able to grip. And after he was done doing that, knowing that the danger is out of the way, he then proceeded to do the killing blow here on the wrist. Really like that. Why expend the energy to reach for the body if the arm is available for you?

Now you see they’re coming to him, so, he doesn’t have to chase them, so, he does have to back up for distance. He’s keeping his eyes on the other assailants. Parry, attack, parry, attack. Very good! Oof! Oof! Yeah that is brutal. Okay, let’s talk about this real quick. One thing I really like about this is that they make use of angles. You’ll note that the camera man is not just staying in one place because the characters are all moving around so much. That’s a real fight. Right, Chad? Like you never stay in one place.”

Chad Vázquez:

“No.”

Logan Lo:

“It’s also never linear So, he’s flanking immediately and attacking from the flank. You know what! Let’s break that down right now.

In the melee scene, all of the attackers came in, in a linear way and then Cha stepped out by parrying with his blade in the icepick grip, and by doing this, other targets were open up for him. For example, the armpit. He comes in here and slashes the armpit. Note that I’m in a position of safety. I’m either flanked or behind the person, whereas the assailant is now in a place of grave danger.

Good pass. Look he’s always trying to get to the back.”

Chad Vázquez:

“Nice.”

Logan Lo:

“Cut underneath the armpit, we need to talk about that. Oh, he’s in safety behind the guy. One of my absolute favorite scenes, is where Cha is finishing off the Man in White. As the Man in White comes in, he passes here. He does a slash. Notice he comes around here and slashes the throat. So, by slashing the throat here, or capturing, he’s now behind the person, and then he’s able to stab him from behind. This is an ideal position. His enemy is in front. He’s using another enemy assailant as a block for himself, while also finishing him off from a position of safety. There is no way, that he can hurt me in a meaningful way, whereas I have killed him in a meaningful way.”

Chad Vázquez:

“Oh nice.”

Logan Lo:

“Okay, okay. Oh! That looks like an armlock.”

Chad Vázquez:

“A Kimura. Yeah!”

Logan Lo:

“Kimura, okay. Now you’d note that it didn’t work, the Kimura. The arm control that he was in, that arm control would’ve worked had Cha not been armed. Correct?”

Chad Vázquez:

“Yeah, the guy let go of the moment and got stabbed in the leg.”

Logan Lo:

“Let’s take a look at that. Let’s break that down. So, here Chad is going to put me into a Kimura, please. Okay and I’m going to try to not let him. We’re going to go slow, but I’m not going to let him do it. [Demonstrates] Yeah, I couldn’t get out of that. But the dynamics change with a knife. I am now armed. Chad you’re going to do the same thing.”

Chad Vázquez:

“Yup!”

Logan Lo:

“I’m going to resist. Alright, so, now I’m resisting as we’re going here. Yeah, that’s not going to work. The introduction of a weapon changes the dynamic of things. So, if this was a street fight and Chad was fighting me but did not know that I was armed with an edged weapon, he’s in danger, because something that should work, it will no longer work. Totally realistic.”

Chad Vázquez:

“And we’ve actually done some training where you guys have a knife there and I’ll tell you right now, when we tried that, weapons changed a lot, when it comes to hand to hand combat. So, that for sure is a real thing.”

Logan Lo:

“So far everything about this scene I love. It’s all textbook knife work.”

“Oof! Brutal. Okay some flailing.”

Chad Vázquez:

“They’re committed to the job; I’ll be out dude. I would be. What! After the fourth guy. I’m gone.”

Logan Lo:

“They might have good dental.”

Chad Vázquez:

“Alright Good point.”

Logan Lo:

“Good! Good! See! Now that show’s his character. This is a man that has been trained. That man has been trained. That’s a killing blow. Now in this film, the protagonist is a trained special operative. This particular killing scene is, when I saw it, I was really taken aback, because it’s so accurate. Without getting into too much of the gruesome details. Most of the films you see, you see someone’s throat being sliced. Here that didn’t happen. He stuck the knife straight through the neck. That is something that is rarely seen. I don’t I’ve think ever seen that. But it is definitely taught in special forces. Now there is some grappling involved, I’m going to let Chad take over from here.”

Chad Vázquez:

“Guy is attacking. I’m dodging and I get two points connection. One on the elbow and one on the neck. I’m guessing that because he’s coming in so fast that with this connection on the neck, he starts pulling down his opponent to the floor. Now remember this rule, ‘Where the head goes, the body follows.’ It’s a very common concept you see in different grappling arts, right? Especially in jiujitsu, wrestling, sambo, judo etc. So, I have my connections here, I feel momentum, so, it seems Cha is moving out and pulls the guy down to the floor with this grip. So, we’re over here, we’re landing, and he falls on to his left shoulder. Now this next part is very quick, but here is what we see. The right leg, steps over the armpit that’s based on the floor. I’ll demonstrate. Back step to control the wrist. And it seems like he’s using his leg to trap the arm. This allows Cha to use his thumbs to push off the knife. Hold on to the hand and the wrist to make sure the arm doesn’t get out. And now he’s with a free hand with a weapon to deliver the killing blow.”

Logan Lo:

“And just a quick comment on the killing blow, it’s done in a very efficient way that really captures how he’s a trained operative. He’s not slashing the throat. He’s just delivering a straight thrust to the neck. Very efficient.”

“Thank you, guys, so much for recommending this scene. I understand. I get it. It’s an amazing film. I watched it as a fan myself. I’m so glad I had the opportunity to review it. This is a perfect scene. One of the things about this scene that I really enjoyed was how it built up Cha as this operative. You can see that he received some world class training to be a special operative. That’s apparent in how he moves. He retreated when he needed to retreat. He attacked when he could attack. And he constantly tried to improve his position while being safe. And that’s something that is very important when it comes to weapon’s work. In this entire scene, Cha kept himself safe. He kept his assailants in front of him. He made sure that he wasn’t flanked while flanking. And he attacked the extremities first before finishing off the bodies, each time. It really made you feel this guy knows what he’s doing and he’s doing it in a very professional, orthodox, efficient manner.”

Logan Lo:

“I as a practitioner of Kali, I’m not sure how I can improve upon it. And that’s really what I look for when I grade things. Like, if this was a real-life situation, what would I have done differently to protect myself or press the attack further? I’m not sure I would’ve done anything differently. I have to give this an A+. It’s a perfect scene. Honestly, great work by the fight choreographers and the director.”

“Thank you so much for watching. If you like the videos that you see here, definitely check out the other ones that we’ve done. If you want to find out more Pekiti Tirsia and Kali in general, our information is down below as well. We’re one of the oldest schools in New York. So, definitely check us out. If you have any other scenes for us to break down, definitely let us know in the comments below. Alright, that’s it! Catch you guys soon! Later!”




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