The transcript below is from the video “Kungfu vs MMA: instant KO. Why does this keep happening in China?” by Ramsey Dewey.

Ramsey Dewey (Shanghai Based MMA Coach and Kunlun Fight Ringside Commentator):

Let’s watch the latest fake kungfu Master get instantly knocked out by a Chinese MMA fighter. The trend of beating up fake martial arts masters popularized by notorious Chinese MMA coach Xu Xiaodong is not limited to him. More and more delusional fake kungfu masters keep getting challenged to fights, or doing the challenging themselves- apparently overestimating their abilities by 9000%. Why does this keep happening?

Ramsey Dewey (Shanghai Based MMA Coach and Kunlun Fight Ringside Commentator):

Hey, it’s Ramsey Dewey over here in Shanghai, China. If you haven’t been paying attention to what’s been going on with Chinese martial arts lately, there’s been this thing, the streak of traditional martial artists who’ve never actually been in a fight before, challenging or getting challenged to a full-contact fight, either MMA or kickboxing or boxing, with an experienced fighter. So, let’s watch the latest iteration of the kung-fu guy who gets instantly knocked out by the real fighter.

Ramsey Dewey (Shanghai Based MMA Coach and Kunlun Fight Ringside Commentator):

Now by kung fu guy, I don’t mean to disparage people who practice kung fu, rather to draw attention to what happens when we have a conceptual martial artist who doesn’t actually train to fight for real, against real live humans with real live resistance and a combat sports athlete who does exactly that. In a contest of reality, the reality based martial artist is going to win. So, let’s watch this bout right here, it’s less than a minute long.

Ramsey Dewey (Shanghai Based MMA Coach and Kunlun Fight Ringside Commentator):

And we’ve got the traditional martial artist bowing in. He’s got his kung fu outfit on. It’s the guy in peril Muay Thai shorts. Kung fu guy is not wearing gloves. The fighter is wearing a pair of MMA gloves. And…single right straight. Single right straight. No setup. No nothing. Here’s an interesting term, ‘sucker punch’, in modern English that means, to surprise somebody with, uh, a surprise punch. That was originally an old boxing term which meant, to lead with your right hand. To lead with your right hand and it was called the sucker punch because only a sucker would fall for it. Sucker punch knockout and the old classical boxing vernacular right there. Kind of want to watch that again.

Ramsey Dewey (Shanghai Based MMA Coach and Kunlun Fight Ringside Commentator):

Let’s take a look, maybe slow it down a little bit. All right. So, again they’re bowing in. They separate. Referee calls the start of action. They touch hands. The kung fu guy has his right arm stretched out. Without a faint or a fake or anything, he left himself straight open down the center, boom, right hand, lead and that’s it. The end. Instant knockout. It’s about what I expected. Little less dancing around than some of these other you know non-fighter versus actual fighter fights. And that’s probably a better way to term it than kung fu versus MMA or whatever. It’s a non-fighter versus a fighter. And that’s what happens when you have somebody who’s good at something here and somebody who isn’t.

Ramsey Dewey (Shanghai Based MMA Coach and Kunlun Fight Ringside Commentator):

So, why does this happen? Why does this keep happening over and over and over and over again? Is this a Chinese phenomenon? Is this unique to the People’s Republic of China? I would say not really. The same thing has happened across cultures and countries many times but what’s different about China is, China didn’t experience UFC 1. I mean you can look it up and watch it here but that whole hullabaloo of UFC 1 changing martial arts in America didn’t really happen here. So, all the established kung fu experts over here and I say ‘kung fu experts’ because there are legitimate fighters who practice kung fu. Just not very many of them. Not here in China. You have to dig deep to find those guys and most of them are old and dead now. And the younger generation doesn’t really want to have anything to do with that these days. Cause it is hard work and hard work is hard.

Ramsey Dewey (Shanghai Based MMA Coach and Kunlun Fight Ringside Commentator):

Hmm, so China didn’t experience UFC 1. They didn’t see Royce Gracie choking people out with jiu-jitsu. They didn’t see what happens when you put karate guys against other karate guys or kung-fu guys against wrestlers or any of that stuff. I mean there have been MMA shows here in China for a while, but they’ve been so under the radar with mainstream culture, for so long that essentially this streak of “kung-fu” guys, non-fighters against actual fighters, is their equivalent of UFC 1. This is their equivalent of seeing Royce Gracie choke out Art Jimmerson or whatever. And it’s revelatory to people. I get a lot of questions about Xu Xiaodong beating up these fake kung fu guys. And you know he’s not the only guy doing it. I mean China’s a big place. You got 1.3 billion people, with a mess people that big, you’re going to see everything, eventually, somewhere in this country. It’s happening.

Ramsey Dewey (Shanghai Based MMA Coach and Kunlun Fight Ringside Commentator):

So, why does this keep happening? And for how long will it happen? You know what, I see the same sort of things start in comment sections on YouTube in martial arts related videos, people will argue about stuff and get mad and say, oh yeah well I challenge you to a fight, meet me in the park or whatever and we’ll have a kung fu Taekwondo karate battle, then we’ll see who is the real deal. Some iteration of that goes on daily on YouTube. Probably a thousand, million, bazillion times.

Why does this keep happening? It’s this weird pride, this weird pride and I understand it because I’ve been there, that a lot of traditional martial pretenders, experience. Guys who have spent many years going to a class, a couple times a week, wearing a uniform, bowing in, punching and kicking at the air and not actually experiencing combat stress, ever. But they believe they know how to fight, even though they’ve never actually been in a real fight before. And I get that. Because I’ve experienced that.

Ramsey Dewey (Shanghai Based MMA Coach and Kunlun Fight Ringside Commentator):

Why? Because you know, many years ago I went to martial art schools just like that. And I got this idea in my head, oh, I’ve earned this belt, I’ve earned this rank, I’ve spent this many years walking in and out of this martial arts school and therefore, I must know how to fight, even though I’ve never actually been in a fight before. But I had the experience of getting into an actual fight and that was revelatory, you know. Getting into a ring to fight professionally in kickboxing for the first time with a background in traditional martial arts like Taekwondo and Shotokan karate and Capoeira. And feeling like that was enough. That was more than enough. That was better than professional fight experience.

Ramsey Dewey (Shanghai Based MMA Coach and Kunlun Fight Ringside Commentator):

It’s amazing how deluded we can get. And there’s that popular quote from Mike Tyson, ‘Everybody has a plan until they get punched in the face.’ I would amend that and say, ‘Nobody has a real plan until, well after they get punched in the face.’ Because that punch in the face, it might knock you out but eventually it’s going to wake you up. It’s going to wake you up to the reality of what a fight is. And how you have to train accordingly to prepare yourself for that kind of action, and that kind of combat stress, and that kind of anxiety. It’s a whole different world my friends. So, why does this keep happening? Well, new humans keep coming in and forgetting the lessons of the old ones.

Thanks for watching now get out there and train.




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