Floyd Mayweather Jr. competed between 1996 and 2015, and made a one-fight comeback in 2017. During his career he won fifteen major world titles including The Ring in five weight classes, the lineal championship in four weight classes, and retired with an undefeated record. As an amateur, Mayweather won a bronze medal in the featherweight division at the 1996 Olympics, three U.S. Golden Gloves championships, and the U.S. national championship at featherweight.

Mayweather was named “Fighter of the Decade” for the 2010s by the Boxing Writers Association of America, a two-time winner of The Ring magazine’s Fighter of the Year award, a three-time winner of the BWAA Fighter of the Year award, and a six-time winner of the Best Fighter ESPY Award. In 2016, Mayweather was ranked by ESPN as the greatest boxer, pound for pound, of the last 25 years. As of July 2020, BoxRec ranks him number two fighter of all time, pound for pound, as well as the greatest welterweight of his era. Many sporting news and boxing websites, including The Ring, Sports Illustrated, ESPN, BoxRec, Fox Sports, and Yahoo! Sports, ranked Mayweather as the best pound for pound boxer in the world twice in a span of ten years. In 2020, Mayweather was ranked second on Ranker’s list of best boxers of the 21st century.

He is often referred to as the best defensive boxer in history, as well as being the most accurate puncher since the existence of CompuBox, having the highest plus–minus ratio in recorded boxing history. Mayweather has a record of 26 consecutive wins in world title fights, 23 wins in lineal title fights, 24 wins against former or current world titlists, 12 wins against former or current lineal champions, and 3 wins against International Boxing Hall of Fame inductees.

Mayweather is one of the most lucrative pay-per-view attractions of all time, in any sport. He topped the Forbes and Sports Illustrated lists of the 50 highest-paid athletes of 2012 and 2013, and the Forbes list again in both 2014 and 2015, listing him as the highest paid athlete in the world. In 2006, he founded his own boxing promotional firm, Mayweather Promotions, after leaving Bob Arum’s Top Rank. Mayweather has generated approximately 24 million PPV buys and $1.67 billion in revenue throughout his career, surpassing the likes of former top PPV attractions including Mike Tyson, Evander Holyfield, Lennox Lewis, Oscar De La Hoya and Manny Pacquiao.

Complex Boxing (Breaking down the techniques and strategies in boxing):

Mayweather is known for being a defense-oriented fighter. What the casual eyes don’t realize is that he also uses his defense to facilitate his offensive arsenal. This brief film study explores the Mayweather defense and the shoulder roll.

Scott Thrower from Complex Boxing:

The Mayweather defense is usually associated with Philly Shell and Michigan Style, but Floyd’s defense was fine-tuned to complement the offense of a true defensive master.

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Floyd’s multifaceted defense is the foundation of his offense. The shoulder roll is his most prominent defensive move. To better understand the shoulder roll, we must understand the design of his defensive posture. Bladed stance to give the opponent a smaller target to hit. Lead shoulder rolled up to deflect right cross and protect the chin tucked in behind it.

[Video of one of Floyd Mayweather’s matches.]

Rear hand placed below the chin or side of the head to block left hooks and parry the jab.

[Video of one of Floyd Mayweather’s matches.]

Glued together by his smooth movements and responsible dodges, Floyd’s shoulder roll is a harmony of defensive moves.

[Video of one of Floyd Mayweather’s matches.]

Scott Thrower from Complex Boxing:

Because of the difference in the dynamics of orthodox versus southpaw matchup, Mayweather does not use the shoulder roll against southpaw fighters. Instead, Floyd anticipates the left cross and ducks underneath it.

[Video of one of Floyd Mayweather’s matches.]

Instead of using his lead shoulder to deflect across, Floyd uses his forearm to lift the southpaw jab.

[Video of one of Floyd Mayweather’s matches.]

After lifting the jab, Floyd follows up with a cross counter. Rolling in to deflect a right cross and rolling out with a stiff right cross is the signature counter punch of Floyd. Roll in, roll out.

[Video of one of Floyd Mayweather’s matches.]

Floyd’s ability to facilitate his offense using his defense is a quality of a true master boxer.




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