The transcript below is from the video “This Is Why KungFu Illegal In Olympics” by Brutal TV.

Brutal TV:

Why don’t the Olympics allow Kung Fu to be shown as a sport?

Martial Arts were among the first sports that became part of the Olympic Games. Going all the way back to Ancient Greece, Wrestling was a part of the 708 BCE Olympics. 20 years later, a type of Boxing referred to as Pyx, which means “with a clenched fist”, had its debut at the 668 BCE Olympics. In 648 BCE, one of the modern mixed martial arts precursors, pankration, was introduced as an Olympic event. During the years, martial arts like Wrestling, Fencing, Boxing, Budo, Savate, and many others appeared at the Olympics, but not Kung Fu. In this video, we are going to look into the possible reasons why the Olympics don’t allow Kung Fu to be shown as a sport?

But before we do this, remember to give us a thumbs up and a quick click on our subscribe button to get more videos like this one and support Brutal TV. Thanks but for now, let’s go back to Kung Fu.

Brutal TV:

Wushu and Kung Fu are two terms that are often used to describe various martial arts that have evolved and developed in China over a period of thousands of years. There are many who consider Kung Fu to be superior to Wushu. This is in part due to the immense popularity of Bruce Lee movies in the West that helped people get to know and learn about Kung Fu. There are many similarities between Kung Fu and Wushu. However, despite similarities, there are also differences. The word Wushu literally means martial arts as it is made up of the two Chinese words: Wu meaning marshal or military and Shu that means skill or method. However, it has been incorporated in English as a single word meaning martial art.

Wushu is a contact sport played at international level. It has been the phrase that has been promoted by the Chinese authorities ever since the Chinese Reform movement started. It has also been turned into a contemporary sport that the Chinese are trying to get included in the Summer Olympics.

Brutal TV:

Kung Fu is a word in Chinese that roughly translates into skills achieved with time and effort. Thus, the word in Chinese society could be used for not just a martial art exponent but also exponents of different skills such as a carpenter, tailor, electrician, or a Karate expert. It was in the 60s that Bruce Lee popularized the phrase in the West and people accepted it as a fighting style. He was the king of Kung Fu as far as Hollywood was concerned. We’re almost at the halfway mark now. So just a reminder to like this video and subscribe to Brutal TV for more top quality fighting videos. Now, back to the Olympics.

In order to survive in an extremely hostile environment, our primitive Chinese ancestors developed primary means of defense and attack that included leaping, tumbling, and kicking. Although they knew how to fight with rudimentary weapons made from stones and wood, fighting with bare hands and fists became essential skills. The martial arts we recognize today as Kung Fu had their origins in the Shang and Zhou dynasties. During the following Qin and Han dynasties, Wrestling, swordplay, and spear skills became well developed and were popular among civilians and troops. Following the Song dynasty, various schools, Boxing styles, movement sets, and weapon skills flourished. Nowadays, it is regarded as a traditional sport gaining more and more popularity and even stands as a representative for Chinese culture. Styles including Shaolin, Tai Chi, and Qigong have many followers worldwide.

Brutal TV:

Although being fighting styles, Kung Fu advocates virtue and peace, not aggression or violence. This has been the common value upheld by martial artists from generation to generation. With a number of movement sets, Boxing styles, weapon skills, and some fighting stunts, Kung Fu keeps its original function of self-defense. Now its value in bodybuilding and fitness is also highly appreciated.

In the mid-1900s, the Chinese government attempted to nationalize and standardize the practice of martial arts in China. In essence, this turned aspects of it into a sport. In 1958, the All-China Wushu Association came to be via an appointment from the government. Along with this, the sport became known as Wushu.

Brutal TV:

Contemporary Wushu has emerged as a competitive sport with several international competitions held, including the World Wushu Championships held every 2 years with rules and regulations set by the International Wushu Federation. Competitions are generally divided into 2 disciplines: Taolu meaning forms and Sanda meaning sparring. Taolu or forms are preordained movements designed to defend against imaginary attackers. The forms part of Wushu competitions are, of course, judged according to specific criteria. However, in essence, the forms that are used are derived in many ways from the traditional Chinese martial arts.

More recently, Wushu competitions have become known for highly flying acrobatics, high level spinning and jumping kicks than perhaps previously. The sparring side of competitions, Sanda, which is sometimes called Sanshou, is a combination of 3 styles of fighting; throwing, punching, and kicking. It is a combat part of Wushu. Due to these styles, Wushu is different from other fighting sports such as Boxing, Wrestling, and Judo. Sanshou was introduced in the international arena in track events in the year 1979. After that, it has become one of the most popular events among athletic players and viewers.

Brutal TV:

Unlike Sanshou, Taolu is the demonstrative part of the fighting skill. Here, the fighters demonstrate Wushu skills like energy, speed, agility, and rhythm. They can perform these demonstrations with or without the opponent according to the requirement of the game. Taolu is recognized in Asian and Olympic Games and is keenly played in all categories like senior, junior or in sub-junior levels. Generally speaking, there are main events in Wushu competitions which are compulsory as well as more individualized events. The compulsory events include bare hand, short weapons, and long weapons.

Brutal TV:

Back in 2008, owing to its cultural significance in China, the International Olympic Committee allowed the organizers of the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing to hold a Wushu tournament in parallel with the games as a separate event, the first time that the committee has allowed such an event. The International Wushu Federation has repeatedly backed proposals for Wushu to be added to the Olympic program, most recently, as one of eight sports proposed for the 2020 Summer olympics in Tokyo, Japan. However, it failed to reach the final short list and the International Olympic Committee ultimately voted for the re-inclusion of Wrestling instead. But why doesn’t Kung Fu or should we say Wushu get a look in? It could be down to the fact the various sports under the title Wushu were too similar to existing ones. The forms competitions becoming very acrobatic like a gymnastic floor exercise which they already have plenty of. The fighting events are similar to Kickboxing or Muay Thai or even Taekwondo. Maybe the Olympic Committee is trying to reduce the number of sports in the program as there are already so many of them.

Brutal TV:

However on January 8, 2020M it was announced by the International Olympics Committee that Wushu will be added to the 2022 Summer Youth Olympics. So at least the youngsters will get their time to shine. On the downside, this event has now been rescheduled to 2026. As the saying goes: all good things come to those who wait.

Do you think Wushu should be included in the Olympics? Tell us about it in the comments below. And don’t forget to like and subscribe to Brutal TV for more top fighting videos just like this one. Thanks for watching. We’ll see you next time.




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